Sheila Moheb
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Moheb Legal Defense, PLLC

Protecting your Constitutional rights and civil liberties with effective and diligent legal representation.

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Free Consultation
Moheb Legal Defense, PLLC
Protecting your Constitutional rights and civil liberties
with effective and diligent legal representation.
~|search~|font-awesome~|solid
~|icon_pin~|elegant-themes~|solid
Free Consultation

COVID-19 NOTIFICATION: To protect your safety in response to the threat of COVID-19, our staff is tele-commuting, but is still available to serve you during our normal office hours. We are offering our clients and potential clients the option to connect with us through telephone, email and video-conferencing. Please call or email us to discuss your options.

Violated parole? There’s still hope

You had an emergency, and even though you were out on parole, it meant you had to violate one of the terms of the agreement. You left the area, and now you’re worried that an arrest warrant may be out for you.

The first thing you should always do if you think you’ve violated parole is to talk to your attorney about your options. You may be able to discuss what happened with your parole officer, who typically has some discretion. For instance, if you violated the terms of your parole because of having to go to a hospital out of state, that could be acceptable compared to someone who flees the area to escape the court or orders he or she is under.

If you are found guilty of violating your parole, that doesn’t automatically mean it will be revoked. You may simply have a longer term of parole or be fined. In other cases, parole can be revoked, but there is a process to this.

You have to go through revocation proceedings before your parole can be “taken back” from you. Usually, there are no attorneys or judges at a parole revocation hearing. It’s parole or hearing officers there to hear the case and decide if a person’s parole should be revoked. You should consider having a witness testify on your behalf if you find yourself in this position.

Parole violations sometimes happen, but it doesn’t have to mean going back to prison. Your attorney can help you understand where you stand with the courts. Our site has more.

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